Crash Course Economics

Monetary policy against austerity? with Daniela Gabor

July 15, 2020 Daniela Gabor Season 1 Episode 4
Crash Course Economics
Monetary policy against austerity? with Daniela Gabor
Chapters
0:00
Introduction
5:32
Start of presentation by Daniela Gabor (DG)
9:13
The development of monetary financing
12:16
Monetary financing regimes
16:55
How did we get to that prudential regime?
23:02
COVID-19 accelerates shift to prudential monetary finance regime
23:56
Structural transformation to low carbon economies demands promotional MF
29:36
Clarification on the two kind of regimes
38:58
How to finance a Green new deal
49:09
Q&A: Promotional monetary financing as temporary measure?
52:35
Q&A: Curbing banks to combat inflation
58:28
Q&A: Inflation
1:03:25
Q&A: On the need to move to promotional regime
1:05:35
Q&A: What about the national political arena?
Crash Course Economics
Monetary policy against austerity? with Daniela Gabor
Jul 15, 2020 Season 1 Episode 4
Daniela Gabor

Daniela Gabor speaks with Sara Murawski and Rodrigo Fernandez about monetary policy and austerity in the fourth and final webinar of Crash Course series on monetary policy, central banks and ideology.

How can monetary policy be used to prevent economies from suffering another decade of austerity? What are the concrete policy options we have?

What are different linkages between monetary and fiscal policy? What can we learn from history?

Monetary policy is portrayed as being purely a technical matter: is there a role for ideology in constructing a monetary framework?


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About Crash Course Economics

Crash Course is a platform designed to open up debate on how we can move out of the current crisis and make the necessary steps towards achieving social, economic, ecological and regenerative justice.

Crash Course is inviting global experts to break down complex issues in lay terms and make them accessible to all so that we can understand how to shape our economic system for a just recovery and future.

Website: https://crashcourseeconomics.org/

Newsletter: https://crashcourseeconomics.us10.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8367ecf9343da28ffa5d80d46&id=e197615bf5

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu3cbKwed48Bu7dkQDVjRQA

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CrashEconomics

Show Notes Chapter Markers

Daniela Gabor speaks with Sara Murawski and Rodrigo Fernandez about monetary policy and austerity in the fourth and final webinar of Crash Course series on monetary policy, central banks and ideology.

How can monetary policy be used to prevent economies from suffering another decade of austerity? What are the concrete policy options we have?

What are different linkages between monetary and fiscal policy? What can we learn from history?

Monetary policy is portrayed as being purely a technical matter: is there a role for ideology in constructing a monetary framework?


---


About Crash Course Economics

Crash Course is a platform designed to open up debate on how we can move out of the current crisis and make the necessary steps towards achieving social, economic, ecological and regenerative justice.

Crash Course is inviting global experts to break down complex issues in lay terms and make them accessible to all so that we can understand how to shape our economic system for a just recovery and future.

Website: https://crashcourseeconomics.org/

Newsletter: https://crashcourseeconomics.us10.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8367ecf9343da28ffa5d80d46&id=e197615bf5

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu3cbKwed48Bu7dkQDVjRQA

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CrashEconomics

Introduction
Start of presentation by Daniela Gabor (DG)
The development of monetary financing
Monetary financing regimes
How did we get to that prudential regime?
COVID-19 accelerates shift to prudential monetary finance regime
Structural transformation to low carbon economies demands promotional MF
Clarification on the two kind of regimes
How to finance a Green new deal
Q&A: Promotional monetary financing as temporary measure?
Q&A: Curbing banks to combat inflation
Q&A: Inflation
Q&A: On the need to move to promotional regime
Q&A: What about the national political arena?